Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th European Conference on Predictive , Preventive and Personalized Medicine & Molecular Diagnostics Edinburgh, Scotland.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Silvia Binder

CEO of the Ondamed Companies and the Founder of The Binder Institute for Personalized Medicine

Keynote: Integration of personalized Biomedical Information Therapy (Bio-IT) into daily practice
Euro Personalized Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Silvia Binder photo
Biography:

Silvia Binder, ND PhD is the CEO of the Ondamed Companies and the Founder of The Binder Institute for Personalized Medicine in Southern Germany where she helps chronically ill patients from around the world. She was born in Germany, grew up in Vienna, Austria, and lived in New York for 20 years. Dr. Binder lectures around the globe, offers Courses on Bio-IT Integrative Personalized Medicine, is faculty of the American Academy for Anti-Aging Medicine and serves on several medical Advisory Boards in North America. She is the author of various scientific papers and the book “ONDAMED A story of love, healing, and medical revolution

Abstract:

 

The realm of personalized Bio-IT is increasingly in demand by physicians/therapists and patients alike. Its foundation is as old as human history and with today’s science and technology it is an available modality to integrate into any type of practice. Working with the energy of a human’s body is a standard in diagnostics of all types of medical specialties. Diagnostically we measure pathology with technologies like MRI, EKG, EEG, Ultrasound, Thermography, and more. On the therapeutic side, the use of physics or energetics in combination with the chemistry model is still a blank area to many physicians due to the lack of information during their primary education. The advanced physician/therapist is seeking the missing link to the chemistry model which is discussed here. The global trend proves patients are not only seeking but demanding less chemical and non-invasive solutions for their chronic illnesses. Moreover, patients are seeking physicians/therapists who recognize their personal needs and are able to offer personalized therapy solutions for getting and staying well

Euro Personalized Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sergey V. Suchkov photo
Biography:

Sergey Suchkov was born in the City of Astrakhan, Russia, in a family of dynasty medical doctors. In 1980, graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and was awarded with MD. In 1985, Suchkov maintained his PhD as a PhD student of the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy and Institute of Medical Enzymology. In 2001, Suchkov maintained his Doctor Degree at the National Institute of Immunology, Russia.From 1989 through 1995, Dr Suchkov was being a Head of the Lab of Clinical Immunology, Helmholtz Eye Research Institute in Moscow. From 1995 through 2004 - a Chair of the Dept for Clinical Immunology, Moscow Clinical Research Institute (MONIKI). In 1993-1996, Dr Suchkov was a Secretary-in-Chief of the Editorial Board, Biomedical Science, an international journal published jointly by the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK.At present, Dr Sergey Suchkov, MD, PhD, is Professor, Chair, Dept for Personalized and Translational Medicine, I.M.Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University and Dept of Clinical Immunology, A.I.Evdokimov Moscow State Medical and Dental University

Abstract:

Abs against myelin basic protein (MBP), cardiac myosine (CM) and thyroid Ags (TPO, T3 and T4) endowing with proteolytic activity (Ab-proteases) are of great value to monitor chronic autoimmune inflammation and to thus illustrate the evolution of either of the above-mentioned autoimmune disorders. Ab-proteases from MS, AIM and AIT patients exhibited specific proteolytic cleavage of MBP, CM and thyroid Ags (T3, T3, TPO), respectively The activity of the Ab-proteases markedly differs between: (i) the patients and healthy controls, and (ii) different clinical courses, to to predict transformation prior to changes of the clinical course.

The activity of Ab-proteases was first registered at the subclinical stages 1-5 years (regardless to type of the disorder) prior to the clinical illness. Some (12-24%) of the direct disease-related relatives are seropositive for low-active Ab-proteases from which seropositive relatives established were being monitored for 2-3 years whilst demonstrating a stable growth of the Ab-associated proteolytic activity. We saw also low-active Ab-proteases in persons at MS-, AIM- and AIT-related risks (at the subclinical stages), and primary clinical, ultrasonic and MRT manifestations observed were coincided with the activity to have its mid-level reached. The activity of Ab-proteases would confirm a high subclinical and predictive value of the translational tools as applicable for personalized monitoring protocols. Ab-proteases can be programmed and re-programmed to suit the needs of the body metabolism. Of tremendous value are Ab-proteases directly affecting the physiologic remodeling of tissues with multilevel architecture. Further studies on targeted Ab-mediated proteolysis may provide a supplementary tool for predicting exacerbations and thus the disability of the MS, AIM and AIT patients.

Keynote Forum

Malakoudis Eleftherios

ALVEK Medical Implants, Chalkidiki, Greece

Keynote: Personalization in coronary/peripheral interventions is the new frontier
Euro Personalized Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Malakoudis Eleftherios photo
Biography:

Mr. Malakoudis Eleftherios is a Greek citizen who has finished the bachelor studies of Medical Faculty of Novisad, Vojvodina, Yugoslavia in 1995. After the studies he entered the field of Medical Devices and rapidly reached senior managing positions. Soon enough he founded ALVEK Medical Implants, a company which is among the top 50 European companies of this field. Among others, currently he is holding the General Director’s position at MEDFIT Hellas (www.medfit.gr). His constant will for unification of the Markets in Balkan and Eastern European Countries and of course his scientific background nominates him as an active and really effective corporate entity in this part of the world

Abstract:

Genomics in the prediction of adverse cardiac events is strongly demonstrated in the literature. Stent thrombosis, in-stent restenosis and dual antiplatelet therapy tolerance seem to be the fields of the early prediction of relevant dependence of the human genomic status. Coronary angioplasty is the interventional approach of the inner lumen of the coronary arteries after a severe thrombus blockage. An intraluminal prothesis is advanced percutaneously through a wire to the target vessel and after a successful expansion is restoring the physiological anatomy of the lumen maintaining the proper blood flow.

The European Guidelines are suggesting Dual AntiPlatelet Therapy (DAPT) from 6 to 12 months. Despite of the effectiveness of the DAPT to avoid thrombus formation, one limitation is severe bleeding and of course patients with stent thrombosis (ST).

The second limitation is in-stent restenosis (ISR). In-stent restenosis is the phenomenon of the reclosure of the stent implants in the target vessel after a successful angioplasty.The last projected topic about the prediction of an adverse cardiac event is to improve coronary heart disease through genetic profiling.

1.CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C9*3 alleles are associated with stent thrombosis: a case– control study. (by A. Harmsze et al., doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehq321) This case–control study aimed to determine the influence of genetic variations related to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel on the occurrence of ST in patients who were on clopidogrel and aspirin treatment at the time of the event. The conclusion is that carriers of the CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C9*3 loss-of-function alleles were at a 1.7- and 2.4-fold increased risk of developing ST, respectively. The influence of these genetic variants was most profound on the risk of subacute ST. Personalized therapy targeting patients who carry these genetic variants might help to improve the clinical outcome after stent implantation.

2.The Cardio Gene Study: genomics of in-stent restenosis. The Cardio Gene Study is designed to understand ISR. Global gene and protein expression profiling define molecular phenotypes of patients. Well-defined clinical phenotypes will be paired with genomic data to define analyses aimed to achieve several goals. These include determining blood gene and protein expression in patients with ISR, investigating the genetic basis of ISR, developing predictive gene and protein biomarkers, and the identification of new targets for treatment.

Genomics in Action: Seeking To Improve Coronary Stent Therapy Through Genetic Profiling (Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D.) Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and other industrialized countries. To improve the outlook for the 13 million Americans suffering from this common disorder, a laboratory that recently joined the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) is tapping into the power of genomics to develop better therapies. Of course further investigation and larger trials have to be scheduled and the researchers have to focus on the personalization of the molecular and genomic level

Euro Personalized Medicine 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Galya Atanasova photo
Biography:

GalyaNaydenovaAtanasova completed her Ph.D. training in Cardiology from Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology and Endocrinology at Pleven Medical University, Bulgaria. She is an assistant prof. and cardiologist at the Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University, Pleven, Bulgaria. She specialized in General Medicine from Pleven Medical University, Bulgaria during 1993. She has attended to many International Events and presented her research work. She did many researches on metabolic syndrome and myocardial infarction of heart

Abstract:

In a number of epidemiological studies, elevated BP has been identified as a risk factor for coronary heart disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, renal failure, and, more recently, atrial fibrillation.

The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of the blood pressure on the prematurity of occurrence of myocardial infarction by logistic regression analysis.

During year 2012 study in 99 subjects with survived MI, inhabitants of Pleven region in Republic of Bulgaria was conducted.
The following biomarkers are tested (fasting): HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TC). Data processing is a logistic regression analysis.

In our study developed two regression models. The first model includes DBP, level of Tg and TC level. The impact of the increase in DBP by 10% on average OR was significantly less in women than in men. The second model includes DBP, Tg levels and levels of HDL-cholesterol. With the greatest influence of DBP in men, where the OR increased 2.19 fold increase in DBP of 10% from the average, while the increase for women was almost twice less.

For men, the second level of influence risk factor is the DBP, and for women it is Tg. Third degree of risk factor for women is total cholesterol and in men at this level and the level of HDL-cholesterol have almost the same effect

  • Biomarkers | Molecular Diagnostics | Oncology | Genetics | Immunology in Personalized Medicine
Speaker
Biography:

Giath Osman has completed his Bachlore degree in medicine and surgery from univesity of Mousel medical school in 1984,He is American Board certified In vascular and General Surgery ,Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons Of Ireland and Has Advanced fellowship Training in Minimal Invasive and Bariatric Surgery in the United States,He is an Activily Practising surgeron through his Private Prcatice and is affliated with George Washington Univesity Hospital in Washington Dc anD Inova Health Sytem in virginia.. He has published in reputed journals and has presented at multiple national and Intrenational conferances

Abstract:

Obesity and Morbid Obesity with its common morbiditis and mortalities is an endimic diease entity in the united states, and it is changing into an epidemic medical problem all over the world,Medical managmnet including dietary and life style modification has not been very susseful as a long term mangmnet tool,Surgical invervention on the other hand in aditions to its surgical complication riscks is associated some times with some unoptimal results and gain of weight after the surgical procedure.Ghreelin hormone reduction surgical procedures might be the start of anew era in the mangment of Obesity and morbid obesity.Im sure of that we all have  noticed an individual or a family member who is described as the lucky one because he or she eats what ever they like and never put on weight during their life cycle,what secret do those indivivuals posses which gives them this unique ability to keep their weight in a healthy range during their life .Can we discover their secret.What can we learn from their metabolic machine. Im going to present a resarch project structure which will eventually individualize and personalize the mangmnet of Morbid obesity and possiblity help in maintaing the weight loss in those individuals

Speaker
Biography:

Deputy Head, Cardiovascular Center, 1st School of Medicine, Charles University, Prague,Main topics of interest: interventional cardiology, pulmonary circulation, published more then 400 articles in cardiology journals all over the world.Editor-in Chief, Cor et Vasa, the official Journal of Czech Society of Cardiology.Member of the Board of  Czech Society of Cardiology, European Socienty of Cardiology, International Andreas Gruentzig Society, Council on Thrombosis and Hemostasis, International Society and Federation of Cardiology.Awards: Medal for Life Work from President of Czech Republic – 2009

Abstract:

First percutaneous balloon coronary angioplasty was performed by Andreas Grüntzig on September 16, 1977 in Curych, Switzerland. His pioneer work started new era of coronary revascularisation all over the world. Since then, interventional cardiology began to grow immensly with new development in several topics: materials, technique of interventions, indications, type of lesions, restenosis prevention and treatment, stents, drug eluting stents, as well as drug treatment focused on early and late thrombosis after interventions. From clinical point of view interventions started with patients with chronic coronary artery disease, but moved further into the field of acute coronary syndromes, including acute myocardial infarction with ST segment elevations. Currently, coronary interventions are quite common way of treatment of coronary artery disease, with hundreds of thousands of procedures performed every year in Europe, as well as in other parts of the world

Speaker
Biography:

She working in the Department  of  Molecular  Oncology  at  King  Faisal  Specialist  Hospital  and  Research Center (KFSHRC) Hospital, SA. One of the co-founders of the Zahra Breast Cancer Association and a member of its scientific committee and Associate Professor in the College of Medicine at Al-Faisal University. she is graduated from the Medical School at UCL-UK and have been working since 2000 in the Oncology Department at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center at KFSHRC Hospital

Abstract:

To date, several genetic, epigenetic and proteinaceous biomarkers have been found to be associated with breast cancer, but their robustness as indicators of disease remains uncertain. More significantly, most women in the developing countries present with this cancer only when it has reached an advanced stage. The treatment of advanced stage presents several challenges but most important among them is the frequent development of resistance to chemotherapy and hormonal therapy which leads to a high mortality rate. In light of this, there is a need to identify sensitive biomarkers that could be useful in early detection and in following the progression of the disease; these might help to identify new therapeutic targets. MicroRNAs (miRs) form a class of non-coding RNA that regulates post-transcriptional gene expression and thereby cellular processes. In breast cancers, dysregulation of the miRs’ expression can result in the progression of cancers. In addition, miRs have been shown to play a role in the development of resistance to drug therapy by regulating signalling cascades. From a cohort of 100 disease-free individuals and 127 breast cancer patients; the levels of these circulating miRNAs are being verified by qRT-PCR. The results of this part have shown over-expression of some types of miRs in the breast tumour patients, while the levels of others remain lower than those in normal individuals. Another interesting pattern emerged when we compared the relative levels of these circulating miRNAs with their expression levels in breast tissue. In addition to intergroup comparisons, plasma miRNA expression levels of all groups were analyzed against cancerous breast tissue (RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas-TCGA). A differential set of   miRNAs were identified in the plasma of breast cancer patients   and

10 miRNAs were uniquely identified based on ROC analysis. The most striking findings  revealed elevated some of the tumor suppressor miRs in luminal breast cancer patients plasma, irrespective of subtype, and elevated in plasma of TNBC breast cancer patients. We found also that, while most miRNAs in plasma reflected cellular levels some of them, had an inverse pattern, thereby suggesting that they were being selectively secreted into plasma. The circulated miRNA patterns indicate signatures which could be as biomarkers for detection, with potential use in screening and in distinguishing the type of tumour type and also could be used as targets for therapies.

Tejashree D. Ghode

Senior Lecturer Rangoonwala College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, India

Title: Ultrasound in Oral Cancer: What we need to know
Speaker
Biography:

Tejashree received her Master's degree M. D. S in Oral medicine and Radiology from Maharashtra University of Health Sciences,  India in 2013. She joined Ragoonwala College of Dental Sciences in 2014 as a Senior Lecturer.  She also has an individual dental practise and Consults at various Dental Clinics in India.  Her focus is on diagnosis and management of Oral Diseases and Maxillofacial Radiology. She has published in reputed international journal and is also a Reviewer.  She has presented papers and posters at various conferences.  Her main research interest includes Oral Cancer and Advanced Imaging modalities

Abstract:

Early detection and treatment of oral carcinoma has an impact on survival rate. Therefore it is crucial to diagnose and image accurately. The pathologic prognostic implicators of oral carcinoma are tumor dimensions, thickness, margins and vasculariy. The rapidity, non-ionizing characteristics, non-invasiveness, less expensive technique, makes Ultrasound an ideal adjunctive pre-treatment assessment modality for staging and prognostic evaluation

Speaker
Biography:

Goncharova Elena has completed her PhD at FBRI State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology “Vector”. She is the senior researcher of Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia. She has published more than 26 papers in reputed journals. Her research interests include oncolytic viruses, development of antiviral therapeutics and vaccines.

Abstract:

 

The development of novel drugs against the influenza virus with high efficiency and low toxicity is an urgent and important task. Herein, we investigated the antiviral potential and a mechanism of antiviral activity of novel sulfonated derivative of β-cyclodextrin [(Gluox)714]-(SO3Na)14 (SCD) against influenza virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1) in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity of SCD examined with respect to uninfected MDCK and A549 cells was shown to be quite low: IC50 values corresponding to survival of 50% cell population were 15±3.3 and 11.5±0.8 mg/mL for MDCK and A549 accordingly. Antiviral potential of SCD was evaluated in MDCK cells treated with serially diluted compound simultaneously with inoculation of the influenza virus. Quantification of virus titers 48 h post infection showed that influenza virus replication had been severely affected. We showed that SCD possesses virulicidal activity and virus was entirely inactivated after incubation with the compound for 6 h at 37°C. Incubation virus particles with SCD did not block neuraminidase activity but resulted in decreasing of virus hemagglutinin activity. The results of the time-of-addition assay suggested that SDC inhibited virus replication only after incubation of infected cells with the compound. The in vitro antiviral effects of SCD were confirmed in a murine pneumonia model of influenza. Our data showed that intranasal treatment of mice with SCD protected the animals from lethal infection and significantly decreased viral titers in lungs of infected animals. Therefore, SCD is promising candidates for the development of antiviral drugs for prevention and treatment of influenza infection

Speaker
Biography:

To be updated soon

Abstract:

Background: Even if patients with stage IV cancer (AC) may have prolonged remissions with chemotherapy (CT), the majority of them, will eventually relapse. In vitro studies suggest that natural killer (NK) cells mediate lytic activity against cancer cell lines and that high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes tumor progression through neoangiogenesis. We have shown that low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 13-cis retinoic acid (RA) increased NK cells and decreased VEGF, in patients with AC and a clinical benefit on CT (Clin Cancer Res 7: 1251, 2001). We hypothesized that IL-2 and RA, increasing NK and decreasing VEGF, could improve disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in a minimal residual disease setting. Primary endpoint was the evaluation of NK cells and VEGF; secondary endpoints were DFS, OS and toxicity. 

Methods: 500 patients with stage IV cancer, who had had a clinical benefit from CT, were given immunotherapy in order to maintain response to CT. Imunotherapy consisted of subcutaneous IL-2, 1.8 X 106 IU and oral RA, 0.5 mg/Kg for 5 days/week, 3 weeks/month, until progression. NK cells, VEGF, response and toxicity were assessed every 4 months.

Results: After a median follow-up of 112 months (range 63-200), a total of 4400 courses of chemotherapy and 2634 courses of immunotherapy were delivered. A statistically significant improvement of NK cells [from a mean of 309 ± 76/mm3 to a mean of 579 ± 74/mm3 (p < 0.001)] and a decrease of VEGF [from a mean of 520 ± 75 pg/mm3 to a mean of 150 ± 12 pg/mm3, (p < 0.001)], were observed. 18-years DFS and OS were 29% and 32%, respectively. A significant improvement, with respect to NCI SEER data (*), was observed in the 5-year OS rate for the most common treated AC: Breast cancer 55% vs. 6% *; Lung cancer 22% vs. 4.3% *; Colorectal cancer 43.5% vs. 21%*. No WHO grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed, while grade 2 cutaneous toxicity and fever occurred in 20% and 13% of patients, respectively. 

Conclusions: Our data show that immunotherapy with IL-2/RA, may determine, with an acceptable toxicity profile, a statistically significant improvement of NK cells, a decrease of VEGF, and better 5-year survival rates with respect to NCI SEER data, for all major cancers.

 

 

Thomas Werner

Chairman of the executive board of m4 Personalisierte Medizin .e.V., Germany

Title: Turning P4-Medicine into reality goes way beyond medicine
Speaker
Biography:

Thomas Werner is the chairman of the executive board of m4 Personalisierte Medizin .e.V., a charitable organization to further personalized medicine. He is also an adjunct professor at the Internal Medicine, Nephrology, University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI, USA. He received his PhD in 1986 and has authored more than 150 peer reviewed scientific articles and book chapters. He founded Genomatix Software GmbH in Munich 1997 and was the CEO and CSO of the company for more than 10 years. His research focus is on new approaches in translational and P4-medicine.

Abstract:

Preventive, predictive, personalized, and participatory medicine (P4-medicine) requires science, medicine, judicial, ethics, and the general public, including politics to cooperate. Only broad consent and support will allow making the necessary changes to our existing health care system. This will not only ensure better medical treatment for many of us, but also offers unique opportunities to combine improved health care with economic saving, mostly coming from the first part - preventive medicine. Challenges are the acquisition of large amounts of molecular data (genome sequences, tumor genomes, transcriptomes, and an ever growing amount of biomarkers) from patients and also from the healthy population. Once sufficient data are available, suitable consent forms must accompany them in order to allow comparative analysis on a sufficiently large scale. Especially the interpretation of -omics data still presents formidable problems we need to overcome, as will be illustrated in just one example. Results need to be stored and safeguarded properly in order to fulfill legal and ethical requirements of data protection. However, current limitations are often decades old and entirely oblivious of the requirements and possibilities of P4-medicine. Here we need sufficient general education to ensure that politician can remove some obstacles in tune with their electorate. This includes health care providers who often see P4-medicine just as another huge attack on their budgets. They need to realize the saving potential especially in prevention and early treatment of chronic diseases. We need viable economic models to demonstrate these effects as real. I will summarize what our association is doing in detail to help facilitate to required change of mind sets in order to make P4-medicine a reality for all of us.

Speaker
Biography:

Girolamo Garreffa was Born in Genova (IT) in May 1959, in the 80s/90s he achieved the Master in Physics and a Professional Doctorate in Health/Medical Physics. Since 2001 to 2012 he was Senior Scientist in MR Physics and Leader of the project Magnetic Resonance and Brain Function at Centro di Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi in Rome. In the same period and up to now he covered  roles as MR Scientist and MRI Physicist in Hospital and Research Institutions among them: NEUROMED (Isernia, IT) Medical Imaging and Neurosurgery Departments; Santalucia Foundation (Rome, IT) Neuro Imaging Dept.; National Research Council (Cosenza, IT) Dept. of Neurological Sciences, University of Tor Vergata (Rome, IT) and Sapienza Univ. of Rome as Professor of  Medical and Applied Physics. Currently he is also MR Scientist at Fondazione Potito (Campobasso, IT), MR Scientist at ME.DI. Center (Napoli) and Head of Applied Physics Section at I.E.ME.S.T.(Palermo, IT).

Abstract:

The proposed study is based on a non-conventional use of advanced methods of MRI with the acquisition of a time series of ultrafast images with contrast weighted on dynamic blood oxygen level. A continuous acquisition is performed before, during and after the application of a standardized stimulus produced by a dedicated external mechanical device acting on the upper part of the ankle of  the foot under investigation. The simultaneous use of MRI compatible Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) detectors, placed on a given distance and position from the mechanical action and on the limb surface can be used to standardize the stimulus by controlling the oxy/deoxy hemoglobin ratio on a tissue volume below the NIRS detector. A dedicated analysis procedure to extract the time course of one or more regions of interest on the acquired MRI foot images, allows  to identify  the mechanical action phase on each related graph obtained. The curve is characterized by a flat portion for basal condition, a descending tract in correspondence of the onset of mechanical stimulus and of a recovery tract immediately after stimulus cessation. A suitable curve fitting of this recovery portion will provide a characteristic time constant directly representative, in its magnitude, of the possible incoming disease and if so, a powerful diagnostic non invasive tool can be realized not only in disease grade assessing but also for the follow-up, for example, to evaluate benefits after drug therapies studies. Preliminary results on health subjects support the feasibility of this investigation procedure

James Russell

Senior Director, Thermo Fisher Scientific, USA

Title: Addressing immuno-oncology research challenges for predictive biomarkers
Speaker
Biography:

James Russell obtained his PhD in Bioanalytical Chemistry from the University of Strathclyde in June 1994.  Then completed a NIH Postdoctoral fellowship at UC Riverside working on the thiol /disulfide chemistry of peptides in HIV conserved regions.  He spent 20 years at Gen-Probe Incorporated where he was responsible for numerous successful IVD products, including the first NAT test, used to screen the nation’s blood supply for HIV and Hepatitis. In 2016 he joined Thermo Fisher as a Senior Director in the R&D department working on Next Generation sequencing assays.

 

 

Abstract:

As progresses continue in the development of breakthrough immuno-therapy treatments, research to identify informative biomarkers becomes increasingly important. We are investigating multiple approaches to identify biomarkers that may be useful in current development efforts and potentially for stratification and/or therapeutic monitoring in the future. These and other projects aimed at helping to advance precision genomics will be discussed.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Jan Kvasnicka aquired MD(1966) and PhD(1986) from Charles University at Prague, his  appoint-ment to Professor in this University was in 2002. He is  chairmen of Molecular Genetic Labortatory at Thrombosis Centre of General University Hospital in Prague. He has published more than 250 papers in reputed journals ( 51 with IF ), his citation index WOS SCI is 809 and hi-index is 15.

Abstract:

Proof of the role of platelets in VTE was provided by two randomized, double-blind trials, WARIS and ASPIRE. Both recently showed a reduction in venous thrombosis recurrence by approximately 30% with the use of the antiplatelet drug, aspirin, compared to placebo. The aim of our study (supported by grant RVO VFN 64165) was to parse the frequencies of selected polymorphisms in platelet genes associated with higher platelets activity in cohorts of patients with venous thromboembolisms. Genetic testing of polymorphisms (SNP) GPVI (Ser219Pro, rs1613662), P2Y12 (haplotype H1/H2, rs2046934; 32C>T, rs 6785930), GPIIIa (Leu59Pro, rs5918), GPIa (807C>T, rs1126643), COX-1 (-842A>C, rs10306114) and PAR-1 (IVS+141G>A), were completed for 2630 persons with VTE and control group of 2637 healthy persons without history of VTE. Results: The examination did not show any significant differences between the polymorphism frequencies in subjects with VTE in comparison to the results obtained in control group. But in the subgroup of women with VTE in pregnancy or in puerperium (n 161) was observed an increase of the risk allele T in GP Ia gene ( 807C>T , rs 1126643) with p = 0.049  ( after Bonferoni correction) and odds =1,513. Between these patients with finding of the risk allele T was observed significance of the next mutation of PAR-1 gene (IVS + 1411G>A) with p = 0.016 and odds =2.256. Conclusion: It is suggested that the observed platelet gene polymorphisms of GP Ia and PAR-1 play role in an increase of primary haemostasis activity in pregnancy as a cause of thrombophilia state, too.

Speaker
Biography:

To be updated soon

Abstract:

As far as the contemporary immunological concepts are concerned, the followings are recognized as facts: (1) All of autoimmune diseases are caused by combinations of organ-specific antibodies and cytolytic T lymphocytes. (2) All of allergic diseases are caused by combinations of allergen-specific antibodies and mast cells. and (3) Equilibrium states exist among antibody molecules in the vicinity of their receptors on the surface of leucocytes. In my opinion, which occurred to me incidentally, an extremely useful point of view could be delineated. Namely, based on the existence of equilibrium state among antibody molecules in the vicinity of their receptors, replacements of specific antibodies with non-specific antibodies would be possible if the latter were accumulated in the vicinity of receptors of antibody molecules. In order to accumulate non-specific antibody molecules, a repetition of intradermal injections with a non-specific antigen preparation is necessary. As an alternative method, intra-venous infusions of saline solution of gamma-globulin might be suggested. However, this method is dangerous
because anti-gamma-globulin antibodies could be produced after a large number of its infusions and an anaphylactic reaction may occur.

Michael R. Briggs

ounder of Woodland Pharmaceuticals,USA

Title: PDX Modeling to Generate Drug-Resistant Tumors
Speaker
Biography:

He have a long career as a leader in the pharmaceutical industry at Director level or above and he is the founder of Woodland Pharmaceuticals.He is passionate about advancing treatment of the deadliest cancers. Our team’s approach involves building relevant in vitro and in vivo models and my focus over the past 10 years has been to increase the likelihood of effective translation to the clinic by establishing primary patient tumor models that are much closer to the patient tumor biology than the traditional cancer cell lines. The highest unmet medical need in oncology therapy is cancer recurrence.   Our ultimate goal is to move to experimental systems using patient-derived tumor models that better inform us of the diversity we are likely to see in the clinic, thus improving clinical outcomes to positively impact patient health and make the drug discovery process more productive and efficient.  The idea is to test the prospective drug in low passage patient tumor samples before we get to the clinical trial, and thus may be likened to a “preclinical trial”. 
 

Abstract:

We developed a mouse avatar technology which involves capturing, expanding, characterizing and viably freezing primary patient tumors at low passage number to better model long-term treatment and recurrence of solid tumors as similar to the patient as possible. Through long-term dosing we are able to generate refractory tumor models resistant to normally efficacious drugs.  Our process can take more than 100 days of treatment to generate drug-resistant models in vivo.  Currently, we implant cells or tumor pieces sourced from patient-derived primary resection.  These models are incredibly powerful when used for molecular profiling to better understand predictive markers of progressive, metastatic, refractory disease, and also empirically as tools for drug discovery. It is our belief that testing new cancer therapies being developed against the very same drug-resistant tumors they are most likely to face in early clinical trials will provide a new level of translational success to future oncology drug discovery programs and improve patient experience in clinical trials

Speaker
Biography:

Paola Cardenas is a dermatologist from National University of Colombia, master in public health and master in cutaneous oncology from Valencia University (Spain) at the Valencia Institute of Oncology. She is the director of the skin cancer program at Virrey Solis Hospital in Bogota Colombia. She works as an associated professor in the dermatology program at National University of Colombia. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed national and international journals.

Abstract:

Serum levels of S100B protein are widely used  as a marker for malignant melanoma, and correlation between serum S100B and disease relapse and survival has been reported. During regular follow-up of patients with malignant melanoma transient elevation of serum S100B protein are observed but the clinical significance of this elevations is unknown. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between transient elevations of serum S-100B protein and the relapse risk of malignant melanoma.

Between 2006 and 2015, 428 consecutive AJCC stage I, II, III clinically disease free melanoma patients, with serum S100B evaluations and followed for at least 5 years were included in this retrospective study.  Relapse occurred in 40.3% of the patients (n=174) during a median follow up period of 70 months. By univariate analysis, transient S-100B elevations were associated with significant relapse risk (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis was performed adjusting for significant prognostic factors (ulceration and TNM) and the transient S100B elevations remained as a significant and independent prognostic factor for relapse (HR  3.18, 95% IC  1.89-5.37; p < 0.001).

Transient S100B elevation is a significant and independent prognostic factor for relapse in melanoma patients. Therefore the S100B may be useful in the follow-up of disease free stage I , II  and III melanoma patients and the detection of the elevated S-100B levels  maybe lead to closer monitoring in follow-up and possibly earlier aggressive surgical or medical treatment of recurrences. To the authors knowledge, the current study is the first evaluation of the S100 B serum transient elevations as a prognostic factor for relapse